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Peter DeHaan Gives Keynote Address at SNUG Convention

Peter DeHaan, the publisher of Connections Magazine and TAS Trader, gave the keynote address at the recent SNUG (Startel Network Users Group) convention in Albuquerque, New Mexico, which was held March 11-14. Peter focused his address on the theme of “how to get the most out of this convention.”

He encouraged people to share ideas generously and receive information graciously, which he summarizes as “Peter’s Law of Reciprocity.” With that as the focus, Peter then continued his address, expanding on this premise by adding his thoughts on “how to get the most out of your business and your life.” His presentation was well-received, garnering enthusiastic and appreciative comments from attendees.

On the convention’s second day, Peter gave a subsequent talk entitled, “The TAS Industry: Preparing for the Future.” In it, he shared eight areas of consideration for the telephone answering service (TAS) industry to address if it is to be well situated for the future. Despite all the rapid changes in the TAS industry, Peter is optimistic about the future prospects—providing that business owners and managers are willing to make strategic and well-informed changes.

“The SNUG group is a great association—with some progressive ideas – and I was honored to be invited to speak at their convention,” stated Peter DeHaan. “Being around industry leaders and innovators is exciting and invigorating—and I was privileged to be part of the collective discussion.”

Peter DeHaan is a veteran of the call center industry and president of Peter DeHaan Publishing Inc, whose publications include Connections Magazine and TAS Trader.

For more information, go to Peter DeHaan’s website.

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Writing and Publishing

How Big is Your Platform?

A few years ago literary agent Amanda Luedeke quantified what constitutes a “solid author platform.” Frankly, her numbers are overwhelming:

  • If you have a blog or website you need 30,000 unique visitors a month.
  • Your Twitter and Facebook need to have 5,000 followers each.
  • If writing for e-publications, 100,000 people a month need to read your work.

This is daunting. Even more disconcerting is knowing that the number of blogs, websites, Twitter accounts, and Facebook pages is growing much faster than the number of people who visit, follow, and view them. This means that on average, everyone is going to have fewer visitors, followers, and viewers.

Regarding other platforms, she noted:

  • If public speaking, it must be 30 times a year to a total of 10,000 people (which equates to 333 people per speaking engagement.
  • If writing for print publications, the number is 100,000 per quarter. (The seeming implication is that print has three times the platform impact as online.)

How discouraging.

However, the emphasis seems to have shifted since then. Sheer numbers mean nothing without engagement. The number of friends, followers, and visitors account for little; it’s the amount of interaction that matters.

I’ve recently heard that an engaged audience of 1,000 is a start. Even a couple hundred really loyal fans can make a difference.

The old view was quantity; the new metric is quality.

I can do that. So can you.

Learn more about writing and publishing in Peter’s new book: The Successful Author: Discover the Art of Writing and Business of PublishingGet your copy today.

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is an author, blogger, and publisher with over 30 years of writing and publishing experience. Check out his book The Successful Author for insider tips and insights.

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Writing and Publishing

The Error in Asking “How Did I Do?”

As I learn more about the business of writing, I am becoming increasingly aware of what I somewhat facetiously call “the dark side of writing,” that is, the imperative need to promote one’s own work.

I am a writer, not a marketer; I enjoy humility while abhorring self-promotion. Yet, I know if many are to ever read what I write, I must embrace the requisite step of personally getting the word out.

One such method is public speaking. Yuck! I write because I prefer it to speak. Yet for the love of my craft, I will pursue and persist in this personal form of torture.

Once after speaking to a local group, I was disappointed and discouraged over how things went. I resorted to a tactic that I knew was unwise and emotionally unhealthy, fishing for a compliment from the person who scheduled me. His sage response put things in perspective.

“Whenever I wonder how I did, I just ask God what he thinks—and that’s all that really matters.”

I have since followed his advice when I speak—and when I write.

Learn more about writing and publishing in Peter’s new book: The Successful Author: Discover the Art of Writing and Business of PublishingGet your copy today.

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is an author, blogger, and publisher with over 30 years of writing and publishing experience. Check out his book The Successful Author for insider tips and insights.

Categories
Writing and Publishing

My Friend, the Author

Do you ever read a book and feel the author is your friend?

This can be especially true if the book includes self-disclosure, as in a memoir styled account. After reading this type of book, I wish I could sit down and talk with the work’s creator: asking questions, sharing observations, and nurturing the budding relationship that germinated as a result of his or her words.

If I happen to see the author in public, I flash my best smile and wave enthusiastically. I have an impulse to run up and say “hi,” offer a handshake, or even give a hug. To me, I am reconnecting with a valued friend; to them, a stranger is accosting them—or a stalker, attacking.

The problem is our relationship is one-sided. I know the author, but he or she doesn’t know a thing about me—or that I even exist.

This also happens with public speaking. Audience members connect with the speaker, forming an emotional connection, but that is again one way.

While I am usually on the admiring side of these situations, in a few instances I have been on the admired side. It’s disconcerting, and I’m often taken aback. Since it happens infrequently, I’m still learning how to best respond, but I want to respond well. My fans are precious, and I want to respect and honor them. And who knows, a two-way friendship may emerge.

Learn more about writing and publishing in Peter’s new book: The Successful Author: Discover the Art of Writing and Business of PublishingGet your copy today.

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is an author, blogger, and publisher with over 30 years of writing and publishing experience. Check out his book The Successful Author for insider tips and insights.