Balancing the Artist with the Entrepreneur: Why Book Publishing Requires Both

Last week I shared that the three parts of publishing a book were writing it, producing it, and marketing it. Each of these aspects has a creative element and a business element, which must be balanced, kept in a respectable tension.

The pure artist says, “Let me create without interference; I don’t care about commercial viability; just let me be me.” The pure artist will likely starve or need to get a day job. read more>>

Six Downsides of Self-Publishing

In my post “Five Reasons a Writer Should Self-Publish,” I listed several advantages of self-publishing. Although compelling, there are also downsides. Consider these six items:

1) Quality is Often Lacking: Traditional publishers put their books through several rounds of editing, to produce the best possible product. The temptation of self-publishing is to skip these steps. Even if a professional editor is hired, the chance of her or him catching everything a traditional publisher would in their multiple rounds of review is slim. But too often, authors self-edit or tap a friend who, although well-intended, lacks the needed experience. From a production standpoint, there’s no reason for substandard output anymore. But it’s too easy and too tempting to cut corners.

2) Credibility May be Illusive: Although self-publishing no longer carries the stigma it once did, some people still consider it a second rate option.

3) Self-Promotion is Required: Self-published authors are responsible for their own marketing, promotion, and sales.

4) The Author Must Become an Entrepreneur: Self-publishing is a business, requiring an investment of time, effort, and money – all with no promise of a return. It’s risky.

5) Limited Distribution: Although some distribution options are available, they don’t match the reach of a traditional publisher.

6) No Advances: Self-publishers must shell out money to publish; advances are not part of the equation.

Six Flavors of Book Publishing

In last week’s post, I talked about traditional publishing and vanity publishing (once the only two options), with hybrid publishing now filling the space between. Hybrid publishing is a combination of the two, with varying options.

Although hybrid publishing is a common term for this ever-evolving assortment of book publishing options, it’s also a descriptive name, with some book publishers opting for other labels. read more>>

Book Review: APE

APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur-How to Publish a Book

By Guy Kawasaki and Shawn Welch (reviewed by Peter DeHaan)

There are many good (and a few not so good) resources that cover self-publishing. Some are in the form of books, others as podcasts, and more as blog posts.

By far the best I’ve seen is the book APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur-How to Publish a Book by Guy Kawasaki and Shawn Welch. APE is an acronym for Author, Publisher, and Entrepreneur, representing the three phases in self-publishing a book. read more>>

The Ultimate Self-Publishing Guide

There are many good (and some not so good) resources that cover self-publishing. Some of these are in the form of books, others as podcasts, and more as blog posts, all from industry insiders.

By far the best one I’ve seen is the book APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur-How to Publish a Book by Guy Kawasaki and Shawn Welch. As the APE acronym implies, the book contains three parts. The middle section, P for Publisher, covers self-publishing, giving a thorough explanation of all aspects. read more>>

The Potential of Artisanal Publishing

In Guy Kawasaki’s new book, APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur-How to Publish a Book, he advances the term “artisanal publishing” as a new way of looking at self-publishing. The vanity publishing of yesteryear can be smartly rejuvenated with a fresh perspective of artistry, hence the concept of artisanal publishing.

As the distinction between traditional publishing versus self-publishing fade, the evolving consideration morphs into mass-produced versus artisanal publishing. After all, who are writers, if not artists? So why not extend artistry to the production and dissemination of their work? read more>>

 

Going APE Over Guy Kawasaki

I don’t normally mention books I haven’t read, but after hearing a podcast with the iconic Guy Kawasaki about his new book, I’ll make an exception. Guy’s latest contribution to society is APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur – How to Publish a Book. Can you see why I’m mentioning it?

APE is an acronym for Author, Publisher, and Entrepreneur, representing the three steps or phases in self-publishing a book. Each step is progressively harder, with the writing phase being the easiest and the entrepreneur needing to focus on the business side of the product, including promotion. read more>>

Traditional Published Authors Need to be Entrepreneurs, Too

Last week I pointed out that self-published authors need to be entrepreneurs and listed what that entailed. The reality is that traditional published authors need to adopt this same mindset, being entrepreneurial as well.

A given requirement is writing a great book. read more>>

Self-Published Authors Need to be Entrepreneurs

In the rapidly changing world of book publishing, an emerging reality is that self-published authors need to be entrepreneurs. Writing a great book is not enough; penning compelling content is only the first step.

Authors desiring to self-publish their work need to view their book as a product and themselves as an entrepreneur; they must develop, execute, and fund a business plan. read more>>