Categories
Miscellaneous

Back to School

In Michigan, today is the first day of school for most of those in public schools.  (By way of contrast, the Indiana school my daughter teaches at is starting their fifth week of classes.)

By State law, Michigan public schools cannot start classes until after Labor Day.  (Private schools need not follow this, but many do).

The reason for this peculiar timing is so to not cut short the summer tourist season.  When schools started earlier, Michiganders would cease their traveling mid-August.  Equally important, high school and college students would quit their summer jobs around the same time to go back to school.  Since many of them worked in industries relating to tourism, this made it harder to serve those tourists who showed up in late August.

Ironically, sports teams are not faced with such restrictions, so prior to classes commencing, most football teams had already played two games.

This seems to suggest that politicians are willing to place limits on education, but not on sports.

I think they have it backwards.

(In a somewhat related issue, some Michigan schools will only have a half day of classes, meaning that some of the kiddies will miss the President’s “stay in school” message, that has so many people in a tizzy.  Some might call that ironic twist, a silver lining)

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is an author, blogger, and publisher with over 30 years of writing and publishing experience. Check out his book The Successful Author for insider tips and insights.

Categories
Writing and Publishing

A Lament for W

No, this isn’t a post about George W. Bush.

Instead, this is a blog about the letter W. I feel sorry for W; you see, it’s hard to pronounce.

Consider the phrase, the “World Wide Web.” It is easy to say; it’s concise, with only three syllables, rolling off the tongue.

Ironically, its abbreviation, “WWW” is a veritable tongue twister, requiring a total of nine syllables to spit out—or six, if you slur your speech. Though I’ve heard a few utterances of “Dub, dub, dub” instead of “Double-U, double-U, double-U,” I’ve never heard of W being pronounced “Dub” in other situations.

I think it’s time to start doing so. After all, the other 25 letters in the English alphabet all enjoy one syllable brevity. I think W deserves similar treatment. We need equality for all letters, regardless of their origin or history. Let’s strike a blow for balance and fairness by treating W with the same accord given to all other letters. Let’s be politically correct and call him “Dub” — like he deserves.

What do you think? Will it catch on? Will you give it a try?

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is an author, blogger, and publisher with over 30 years of writing and publishing experience. Check out his book The Successful Author for insider tips and insights.

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is an author, blogger, and publisher with over 30 years of writing and publishing experience. Check out his book The Successful Author for insider tips and insights.

Learn more about writing and publishing in Peter’s new book: The Successful Author: Discover the Art of Writing and Business of Publishing. Get your copy today.