Categories
Writing and Publishing

Where Did It Go?

paragrapg

I really, really try to not go back and read what I have already posted.  First of all, it’s not a good use of my time. Secondly, revisiting my work causes me to either be too critical of what I wrote or too generous–neither of which is a healthy consideration. Last, with each re-read, I will inevitably find something that I want to change. I have this propensity towards endless, ongoing improvement—a relentless pursuit of perfection. Sometimes that is good, but usually, it is more akin to “spinning my wheels.”

Having proclaimed all that, I remember that I re-read an old post. In the second paragraph, I discovered a word that I thought I changed. In the fourth paragraph, I found an error that I was sure I had corrected. I thought I was losing my mind—until I discovered that the last two paragraphs were completely missing!

I had thought I know what happened. The program that I used to write my blog was accessed over the Internet. Sometimes it moved much slower than I had the tolerance for. In my impatient mouse-clicking, a preliminary version (I periodically saved my work as I was writing) must have been posted and my completed version somehow lost.

I fixed again the two errors and tried my best to reconstruct the final two paragraphs. To my dismay, I couldn’t remember everything exactly right and I was quite sure that the lost version was much more brilliant than the recreated one. But you’ll need to take my word on that, as the original version was forever and totally lost—only the reconstructed one is available for your consideration.

Have you ever lost work in your computer or permanently deleted an important file? We all have—at one time or another—and I feel your pain!

Learn more about writing and publishing in Peter’s new book: The Successful Author: Discover the Art of Writing and Business of Publishing. Get your copy today.

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is an author, blogger, and publisher with over 30 years of writing and publishing experience. Check out his book The Successful Author for insider tips and insights.

Categories
Writing and Publishing

Login Fatigue

Do you suffer from “login fatigue?” I know I do. Login fatigue is that overwhelmed feeling produced by having too many computer login names, passwords, and codes to keep track of. (A Google search for “login fatigue” resulted in 75,400,000 entries, more than a hundred times higher then when I last checked. I am sure that number will keep growing.)

It’s not that I’m lazy or trying to make a statement about logging in. The sad reality is that I had way too many logins to keep track of.  As a result, I’ve had to resort to maintaining a list of my various cyberspace logins.

For the most part, I needed every one of them to conduct business. There are a variety of financial websites, secure access for numerous services, a plethora of logins for my diverse Internet presence (email, Websites, blogs, search engines, and so forth), and even a few—a precious few—for personal enjoyment.

Because of this frustration, I used to regularly close websites that require I login just to peek at their treasure trove of information. I’m not talking about those pay-for, subscription sites—which I steadfastly avoid. I’m referring to those free sites that demand that I setup an account and login with each visit. Nope, it’s not going to happen.

Its been suggested that we need some sort of universal login, one login that will work for multiple sites. That sounded great to me; I needed it. And so when I’ve heard about Last Pass a password manager, generator, and vault, I tried it. This might be the solution we all seek.

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is an author, blogger, and publisher with over 30 years of writing and publishing experience. Check out his book The Successful Author for insider tips and insights.

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is an author, blogger, and publisher with over 30 years of writing and publishing experience. Check out his book The Successful Author for insider tips and insights.

Categories
Writing and Publishing

Computer Rage

computer traffic

We’ve all heard of road rage—and I suspect have on occasion had that split second impulse to ram our car into an offending driver. (Please tell me that I’m not the only one.) Fortunately, common sense and civility prevail and actual vehicular assault is rare, is caused by a limited number of drivers who should not be behind the wheel.

I think that road rage has a corresponding technology affliction called computer rage. It’s when our computers cause us so much infuriating irritation that we want to hurt them; and there was a time, I had it bad.  All three work computers had issues, which were stubbornly hard to resolve. Fortunately, it was a slow week for me, as I needed to devote most of my work hours towards their resolution.

One of the three problems was fully resolved, the most debilitating one was resolved to a functional level, and for the third, there was an easy—if not irritating—work around.

Learn more about writing and publishing in Peter’s new book: The Successful Author: Discover the Art of Writing and Business of Publishing. Get your copy today.

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is an author, blogger, and publisher with over 30 years of writing and publishing experience. Check out his book The Successful Author for insider tips and insights.

Categories
Call Center Articles

When Innovation Falls Short

I recently bought a laptop and included a carrying case with my order. There would be two shipments, first the case and a week later, the laptop. I was given shipping dates for both.

The case arrived a day before it was promised, which impressed me. I like to say, “Under promise and over deliver.” They did that.

Two hours after the package arrived, I received an automated phone call from the shipper, telling me I would receive a delivery tomorrow and would need to be present to sign for it.

Their message came a day too late.

A week later the laptop was delivered. The day after it arrived, I received the same message from the shipper.

This time the phone call came two days late.

I applaud their intent, but laugh at their execution. I can appreciate there might be glitches in perfecting a new process, but those need to be resolved before rolling it out to customers.

This is one more reason why I don’t like receiving deliveries from this shipper.

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is the publisher and editor-in-chief of Connections Magazine, covering the call center teleservices industry.

Categories
Writing and Publishing

Are Two Displays Better Than One?

This week I received an email from a PR guy, pushing a press release for his client (www.ergotron.com and dare2dual.ergotron.com).  In the teaser, he wrote:

“Imagine how much companies would gain and save if they equipped all of their employees with more than one computer display.  The research findings are conclusive and striking: nearly a 20 percent gain in productivity, not to mention the benefits of happier, healthier employees.”

I wholeheartedly agree.  I’ve been dual-screening for about a year and find it frustrating to be restricted to single screen viewing when I use another computer.  I certainly concur with the 20% productivity boost — mine might even be higher.

Having two displays is great, but sometimes it still doesn’t seem like enough.  I want more.  If two is good, then three should be better, right?  Would three give an additional 20% boost in job efficacy?  I could defiantly put three to good use.  However, this brings up a positioning question: Should they all be placed side-by-side in a long row?  That may cause too much neck turning.

The other thought would be to place the third one above the other two.  But that creates symmetry issues.  If would seem weird to center the top one, offset from the other two.  But if I line them up two on the left, that would leave a hole, crying for a fourth unit.

Four displays would be symmetrical — and balance is a good thing.  But to have two on top of the others, creates a mounting problem.  I can’t just levitate the upper two.  I think I’d need a wall mount bracket or a desk riser.

Wait, that’s what Mike, the PR guy, was pitching.

Learn more about writing and publishing in Peter’s new book: The Successful Author: Discover the Art of Writing and Business of Publishing. Get your copy today.

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is an author, blogger, and publisher with over 30 years of writing and publishing experience. Check out his book The Successful Author for insider tips and insights.