3 Perspectives on Print Versus Digital Publishing

The form that a published book takes doesn’t matter as much as many people think

3 Perspectives on Print Versus Digital PublishingPublishers, authors, and readers each approach the print versus ebook debate from different perspectives. Among these three points of view exist an array of opinions. Consider:

Publishers are in business to make money. Never forget that. They aren’t philanthropists, seeking to advance authors’ work or serve the common good (though both are laudable secondary goals). They can make money in print or with e-books. While the outcome is not guaranteed, the potential for profit is there. Some focus on the printed word and others, electronic output, while most do both. For them print versus e-book becomes a strategic decision with a financial outcome. read more>>

Save

9 Keys to Self-Publishing Success

It’s never been easier to publish a book, but that doesn’t mean we should

9 Keys to Self-Publishing SuccessI once read a self-published e-book, a novella. I read it for several reasons: it was recommended (which turned out to be a bad reason), it would be a quick read, I’d never read a novella, and it was free (I got what I paid for).

On the plus side, the opening captured my attention, the story line was intriguing, and the ending was a delightful surprise. On the negative side, the book did not flow smoothly, was poorly edited (or not edited at all), contained many errors, and was poorly converted into e-book format. Overall, the great ending did not overcome all the negative elements. read more>>

Save

Save

Save

What is the Future of Book Publishing?

Will book publishing follow the path of the music and movie industries?

What is the Future of Book Publishing?When people look at the future of book publishing they often draw parallels to music and video. In many ways this is instructive, but not in all cases.

Look at the history of music. With music there were 78-rpm records, cassettes, 8 tracks, vinyl records, CD, and iTunes/iPods. read more>>

Digital Publishing Pros and Cons

Consider both publishing options for your next book

Digital Publishing Pros and ConsFor the past few years, there has been a great deal of press — and hence a great deal of excitement — about e-books.

Correspondingly, there is also significant debate about the relative merits of each option. The purists insist that the printed version is the way to go, nearly sacred. While the technologists say that e-books are where it’s at, declaring that paper is passé. Of course the diplomat insists that there is room for both. read more>>

Do You Believe in Print?

Despite interest in audio and ebooks, don’t write off print

Do You Believe in Print?As writers our books can appear in three primary formats: print, ebook, and audio.

Audio books have enjoyed a resurgence of late. Gone are the days of books on tape. Now it is digital files that readers listen to from their smartphones. This form of consumption has soared in the past couple of years, especially among younger generations. Audible books have also received a lot of buzz in recent months among the writing community. It seems I hear more about audio books than ebooks nowadays. read more>>

Let’s Make the New Year Your Best Year Yet

Happy New Year!In The Book Blog we talk about writing books, producing books, and marketing books. Successful writers must do all three. Neglect one element and your book will fail to meet your expectations and reach its full potential.

Even if you find a traditional publisher they will only handle the second requirement: publishing your book. Unless you are an A-list author they will do little marketing for you and expect you to put forth most of the effort. read more>>

A Year in Review: Top 10 Book Publishing Posts in 2015

As 2015 winds down and we get ready to boldly move into 2016, here is our annual year in review list. The top ten posts on The Book Blog for 2015 are:

  1. Get Ready For the New YearWhy We Need a Book Proposal for Every Book We Write
  2. Five Steps to Write Back Cover Copy For Your Book
  3. What Do Readers Care About?
  4. The Two Extremes of Self-Publishing: Both Are Wrong
  5. 7 Reasons Why Books Are Rejected
  6. Three Reasons to Comment on Blog Posts – and One Reason Not To
  7. What Email Open Rates Mean
  8. Three Reasons to Comment on Blog Posts – and One Reason Not To
  9. Becoming a Hybrid Author: A Case Study of Author Robin Mellom
  10. The Three Parts of Book Publishing

And here are two more that would have cracked the top 10 list, but they were actually written in 2014. Even a year after they were posted, readers continue to find and enjoy them:

  1. What’s the Difference Between a Category and a Tag on Your WordPress Blog?
  2. WordPress Primer: Seven Tips to Get Started Right and Minimize Confusion

Which of these is your favorite? Are there any you would add to the list? Please share your thoughts in the comment section below.

Know Your Target Book Length Before You Start Writing

It seems many writers start writing a book without knowing how long it should be. Often they end up with a length that lacks marketability, can’t be economically produced, or will require substantial edits to make it the right size. It may be too long; it may be too short. Both problems take time to fix – if they can be fixed at all.

A friend recently finished writing her “book.” It was 8,500 words, she said with a smile; she hoped that would be okay. She was dismayed to learn it wasn’t even close. It even fell short of common length expectations for a novella. Most would call her book a short story. read more>>

Do You Want People to Buy Your Book or Read Your Book?

We all want people to buy our books and then read our books. That’s the ideal. But what if we can realize only one of these two outcomes? Would we rather have people buy our book or read it?

Do You Want People to Buy Your Book or Read Your Book?In the first scenario a lot of people would buy our book but they never actually read it. It sits around unread and later moves to a book shelf and later still ends up in the trash. No one ever reviews the book or lets us know how much they enjoy it.

In the second scenario readers download our book for free, read someone else’s copy (that wasn’t paid for either), receives an advanced copy, or finds a pirated version. We receive a boatload of positive reviews and everywhere we go it seems someone says how great our book is. A lot of people read our book and love it, but we never make one penny from it. read more>>